Tahsis to Santa Gertrudis Cove

Lots of sun this morning, but we are in no hurry. Eight o’clock was our planned wake up time and we did not expect to get underway before ten. I love these leisurely mornings. There will be some long days ahead with “O-Dark Thirty” wake up calls but for this morning, I’ll take it slow.

  Westview Marina view from the land

Westview Marina view from the land

  Saying goodbye to Westview Marina

Saying goodbye to Westview Marina

Some of the fishing fleet had already departed when I finally made it to the salon. I kind of remember hearing one small engine start but that was it. Either I was sleeping very soundly, or they were very courteous in their departures.

Breakfast was easy, cinnamon buns baked fresh yesterday at the Westview Marina.

Karen and I walked up to drop off trash and make one final link to the internet before we departed.

Heading south down Tahsis Inlet, the winds were light and the water calm. Our destination is Friendly Cove. Lots to do at our next port of call: visit the light house, check out the church and walk over to the native wood carver’s shed on the cove.

  The light and docks at Friendly Cove

The light and docks at Friendly Cove

As we approached, Karen spotted the Uchuck III, a cargo vessel that now also takes passenger on day trips in the area. Its 110 feet and is the third in a line of vessel to bear the Uchuck name. Being a converted wood mine sweeper, it is stout and solid.

  The  Uchuck III

The Uchuck III

We dropped anchor in the cove in 30 feet over sand and mud and took the dinghy over to the dock. The Uchuck III was on the main dock in the process of loading passengers and gear form a community youth camp outing that was wrapping up from last weekend.

  Loading today's cargo and passengers

Loading today's cargo and passengers

  The  Uchuck III  leaving dock. We hope he has  Alaskan Dream  in sight. 

The Uchuck III leaving dock. We hope he has Alaskan Dream in sight. 

The Lighthouse compound is one of the prettiest we’ve seen. It is staffed by Joanne and her husband. She was very gracious and showed us around and shared some great stories about their life as light keepers.

 

  Picture postcard view of the light at Friendly Cove

Picture postcard view of the light at Friendly Cove

  Karen explores the compound

Karen explores the compound

They have been stationed here for 8 years. They are responsible for all maintenance. The light receives about 2500 visitors a year. In addition to the light house they serve as coordinators of search and rescue missions in the area and are sometimes called upon as first responders. It’s lots of work and lots of responsibility.

  This is how they get the supplies from sea level to the lighthouse

This is how they get the supplies from sea level to the lighthouse

  The bridge to the lighthouse

The bridge to the lighthouse

  Breathtaking views from the lighthouse

Breathtaking views from the lighthouse

The church is a 10 minute walk from the light and well worth the visit. In the church you will see beautiful stained glass windows commemorating the signing of the treaty between Britain and Spain establishing the boundary claims in this part of Canada.

  Commemorative stained glass graces the windows

Commemorative stained glass graces the windows

  The totems guarding the church 

The totems guarding the church 

  The new totem welcomes all, Bob provides scale

The new totem welcomes all, Bob provides scale

Two weekends ago, the native community that lay claim to the area, the Maguinna, erected a totem depicting the chief and “the people” with welcoming outstretched arms. Of course we checked that out and continued on to walk to the beach.

The walk along the south beach is not to be missed. We spotted humpbacks continuously diving. The people at the church said there was a whale rubbing himself on the pebble beach not ten minutes earlier.

The walks around here consist of smooth wide paths ranging from paved to well-trodden and meticulously maintained. All were relatively flat and made for easy walks. There is a twelve dollar a person “walking fee” collected by the First Nation’s tribe, but considering the facilities, including a very nice toilet, it is a fair toll to pay. Late in the afternoon we moved to a safer and more secure anchorage called Santa Gertrudis, where we had a lovely evening.

  Friendly Cove light and Alaskan Dream

Friendly Cove light and Alaskan Dream