Duncanby Landing to Bull Harbour

We’re up at six for a planned 7am departure. We had planned our departure time to pick up some push from the tide as we rounded Cape Caution. There is not much current to be had on our intended course, but any help is appreciated.

Some of the fishing boats from the Lodge had already departed, but most were still tied to the docks.

I topped of the water tanks after we showered and released the lines that held us to the docks. As we departed Duncanby, one boat from the Lodge after the other rushed past us in search of salmon.

The forecast called for one foot chop with a low westerly swell. Alaskan Dream rode the swells up and down, but there was no chop. As we made our way toward Cape Caution, we saw a few humpbacks whales. First we saw a solo whale, then a larger group of five to six. I think two of them were mother and calf owing to the close proximity of their spouts.

Later we spotted three sea otters and a sea lion who was devouring a meal of fresh fish on the surface.

We spotted a cruise ship on the AIS and a couple of tugs with their tows. A BC Ferry graced our route headed northeast.

The low westerly swells continued with no chop and we were tempted to adjust our course a little west and make the run for Cape Scott. But our taste for extremely long days was gone after our 16 hours coming from the Haida Gwaii. Add to that a reasonable forecast for the next day, and we were pleased to make good our course for Bull Harbor.

After my first two hour watch, I made breakfast. My original plans included eggs, but the swells dictated a menu change to toasted peanut butter and jelly sandwiches along with fresh cantaloupe. Sugar, carbs and protein with some fresh fruit makes it seem like a well-balanced breakfast and we are set until after we drop anchor about 1pm.

  No one likes sea gulls except when they mark the log in the water

No one likes sea gulls except when they mark the log in the water

The swells stayed with us for the entire passage although they diminished the closes we got to our destination. We also chased the fog as we proceeded southwest, never quite catching it. All in all, it was a peaceful crossing.

  No question where the prevailing winds come from

No question where the prevailing winds come from

Bull Harbor is a popular stopping point for boats to stage before they go around Cape Scott. Karen thinks there will be 10 boats there tonight. I think 5 or less.

As we make our way up the channel to Bull Harbour we were greeted with no other boats in the anchorage. We set our anchor; had a little snack of goat cheese, pepperoni and cherry chutney.

In the late afternoon, Karen and I took the dingy over to the community docks to start our walk to Breakers Beach. The walk is about 1 mile with first three-quarters on a nice gravel road and the last quarter through a well-marked and easy trail. Given the extremely calm conditions, there were little or no breakers to be seen. Apparently these beaches are renowned for massive breaking waves when the conditions are favorable.

  We are very happy from a great walk over to the east beach

We are very happy from a great walk over to the east beach

We talked with the people aboard Kodiak, a 59 Grand Banks Aleutian headed to Anacortes that was tied to the community docks. On our dinghy ride back, we stop at the steel hulled sailboat and discussed with cruisers about the rounding of Cape Scott tomorrow. They did not know about the passage through the Tattnall Reefs that lets you avoid most of the nasty stuff at the Nahwitti Bar.

  Karen exploring the rocks

Karen exploring the rocks

  Bob sticks to the grassy knoll, for a great view of the bay

Bob sticks to the grassy knoll, for a great view of the bay

  The beach at the end of the walk

The beach at the end of the walk

  Bull Harbour

Bull Harbour

Tomorrow we are leaving at 8:30am in order to arrive at Cape Scott at high slack and then round the cape and ride the ebb to Winter Harbour.

Dinner was grilled Halibut tacos.